Human West Nile Virus Cases Identified in Washington County

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Human West Nile Virus Cases Identified in Washington County

Health Officials Encourage Taking Precautions

Mosquitoes trapped in Owyhee County have tested positive for West Nile virus. The mosquitoes carrying the virus were trapped south of Homedale. This area is not located inside a mosquito abatement district.

Canyon, Gem, Elmore, and Twin Falls counties have also reported positive WNV results in some of their mosquito traps.

Residents are encouraged to take extra precautions to avoid being bitten. Precautions include draining any standing water on your property and wearing repellent when outdoors.

West Nile virus is a potentially serious illness that is usually spread to animals and humans through the bite of an infected mosquito. Although most infections do not cause symptoms, one out of five who become infected with West Nile virus show symptoms such as fever, headaches, body aches, nausea, vomiting, and sometimes swollen lymph nodes, or a skin rash. These symptoms can last for only a few days, or may last for several weeks. Symptoms typically occur from 2 to 14 days after the bite from an infected mosquito. There is no specific treatment, but in more severe cases, people usually need hospitalization.

For more information on West Nile visit https://www.cdc.gov/westnile/prevention/index.html
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Media Contact:
Katrina Williams
Southwest District Health
Katrina.Williams@phd3.idaho.gov
(208) 455-5317

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Mosquitoes in Adams and Washington Counties Test Positive for West Nile Virus

Mosquitoes in Adams and Washington Counties Test Positive for West Nile Virus

Mosquitoes trapped in Adams County and Washington County have tested positive for West Nile virus. The mosquitoes carrying the virus in Adams County were trapped in Fruitvale and Indian Valley. The mosquitos trapped in Washington County were trapped near the north side of Weiser. These areas are not located inside a mosquito abatement district.

Canyon, Gem, Owyhee, and Payette counties have also reported positive WNV results in some of their mosquito traps.

Residents are encouraged to take extra precautions to avoid being bitten. Precautions include draining any standing water on your property and wearing repellent when outdoors.

West Nile virus is a potentially serious illness that is usually spread to animals and humans through the bite of an infected mosquito. Although most infections do not cause symptoms, one out of five who become infected with West Nile virus show symptoms such as fever, headaches, body aches, nausea, vomiting, and sometimes swollen lymph nodes, or a skin rash. These symptoms can last for only a few days, or may last for several weeks. Symptoms typically occur from 2 to 14 days after the bite from an infected mosquito. There is no specific treatment, but in more severe cases, people usually need hospitalization.

For more information on West Nile visit  https://www.cdc.gov/westnile/prevention/index.html

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Media Contact:
Katrina Williams
Southwest District Health
Katrina.Williams@phd3.idaho.gov
(208) 455-5317

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Mosquitoes in Owyhee County Test Positive for West Nile Virus

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Mosquitoes in Owyhee County Test Positive for West Nile Virus

Mosquitoes trapped in Owyhee County have tested positive for West Nile virus. The mosquitoes carrying the virus were trapped south of Homedale. This area is not located inside a mosquito abatement district.

Canyon, Gem, Elmore, and Twin Falls counties have also reported positive WNV results in some of their mosquito traps.

Residents are encouraged to take extra precautions to avoid being bitten. Precautions include draining any standing water on your property and wearing repellent when outdoors.

West Nile virus is a potentially serious illness that is usually spread to animals and humans through the bite of an infected mosquito. Although most infections do not cause symptoms, one out of five who become infected with West Nile virus show symptoms such as fever, headaches, body aches, nausea, vomiting, and sometimes swollen lymph nodes, or a skin rash. These symptoms can last for only a few days, or may last for several weeks. Symptoms typically occur from 2 to 14 days after the bite from an infected mosquito. There is no specific treatment, but in more severe cases, people usually need hospitalization.

For more information on West Nile visit https://www.cdc.gov/westnile/prevention/index.html
#####

Media Contact:
Katrina Williams
Southwest District Health
Katrina.Williams@phd3.idaho.gov
(208) 455-5317

 

 

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Gem County Mosquitoes Test Positive for West Nile Virus

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Gem County Mosquitoes Test Positive for West Nile Virus

Mosquitoes trapped in Gem County have tested positive for West Nile virus. The mosquitoes carrying the virus in Gem County were trapped outside of the Gem County Mosquito Abatement District near the Payette County border. This area is not located inside a mosquito abatement district.

Residents are encouraged to take extra precautions to avoid being bitten. Precautions include draining any standing water on your property and wearing repellent when outdoors.

West Nile virus is a potentially serious illness that is usually spread to animals and humans through the bite of an infected mosquito. Although most infections do not cause symptoms, one out of five who become infected with West Nile virus show symptoms such as fever, headaches, body aches, nausea, vomiting, and sometimes swollen lymph nodes, or a skin rash. These symptoms can last for only a few days, or may last for several weeks. Symptoms typically occur from 2 to 14 days after the bite from an infected mosquito. There is no specific treatment, but in more severe cases, people usually need hospitalization.

For more information on West Nile visit https://www.cdc.gov/westnile/prevention/index.html
#####

Media Contact:
Katrina Williams
Southwest District Health
Katrina.Williams@phd3.idaho.gov
(208) 455-5317

 

 

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NEVER FEAR—READYKAMP IS NEAR!

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

CALDWELL, IDAHO – Southwest District
Health (SWDH) and Southwest Idaho Medical Reserve Corps (MRC) are now in
preparation for Idaho READYKAMP 2019 to promote citizen preparedness among
local youth. The camp is designed for 7th, 8th, and 9th graders who
reside in Southwest Idaho and are interested
in learning how to help their families
and communities become
safer, stronger, and more
prepared in the case of an emergency. This is the sixth year for the camp.

“This preparedness camp empowers
our youth to serve as ambassadors of preparedness for their communities with
hands-on exercises, learning opportunities, and fun activities,” said Ricky
Bowman, Public Health Preparedness Manager for Southwest District Health. “Our
graduates are encouraged to share their newly acquired expertise with their
families, schools, and communities so that all are safer and better prepared if
disaster strikes,” he said.

Camp participants learn about
disaster preparedness, hazardous materials, fire safety, search and rescue,
water rescue, triage, Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR), first aid, emergency
radio communications, and terrorism.

Training modules are presented by
local first responders and experienced MRC volunteers using the Federal
Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) Teen Community Emergency Response Team
(CERT) curriculum. This emergency preparedness training is combined with
traditional summer camp activities, such as movie nights, camp fires,
marshmallow roasts, pizza parties, and field trips.

“Last year we
had 12 returning campers from the previous year said Jeff Cappe, ReadyKamp
Coordinator. “Their contribution was significant because they were able to
instill a level of trust and acceptance in the first year campers that an adult
in the same situation may not be able to accomplish. The campers were inspired
by the knowledge and leadership of the team leaders,” he added.

The campers participate in a
“mock” disaster exercise, using the skills and knowledge they have gained
during camp. Each camp participant is assigned a response role and functions as
a first responder. For 2018, the mock disaster scenario incorporated an explosion
in a high school basement.

The camp culminates with a graduation and awards dinner for the campers and their families. Last year, thirty-two successful graduates earned a diploma and received a preparedness backpack filled with emergency preparedness and response gear. Cappe added parents have noticed that in addition to basic response skills, their youth have also gained awareness for action planning, leadership, and teamwork.

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MEDIA CONTACT:

Katrina Williams
Katrina.Williams@phd3.idaho.gov
208.455.5317 

 

 

 

 

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CYANOBACTERIA (BLUE-GREEN ALGAE) ADVISORY LIFTED FOR BROWNLEE

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE                                                        

CYANOBACTERIA (BLUE-GREEN ALGAE) ADVISORY LIFTED FOR BROWNLEE

Southwest District Health, in conjunction with the Idaho Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ), has lifted the Cyanobacteria Health Advisory for Brownlee Reservoir. The advisory was issued in July 2018.

DEQ officials monitor cyanobacteria and associated toxins where harmful algal blooms (HABs) are present and have confirmed that cyanobacteria levels in the Brownlee Reservoir have returned to normal and toxin levels are below the safety threshold.

Other blooms may exist on this waterbody that have not been reported to DEQ or the health district. Water users should always exercise caution around water bodies with visible slime or surface scum or a foul odor. High concentrations of toxin-producing cyanobacteria may cause illness to both humans and animals. Report any concerns to DEQ at 208.373.0550.

For more information about harmful algal blooms, visit DEQ’s website at http://www.deq.idaho.gov/water-quality/surface-water/blue-green-algae/.

# # #

Chase Cusack, DEQ                         208.373.0490              Chase.Cusack@deq.idaho.gov

Katrina Williams, SWDH                    208.455.5317              Katrina.Williams@phd3.idaho.gov

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CYANOBACTERIA ADVISORY LIFTED FOR COTTONWOOD PARK AND CAMPGROUND AT C.J. STRIKE RESERVOIR

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Southwest District Health (SWDH), in conjunction with the Idaho Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ), has lifted the Health Advisory for Cottonwood Park and Campground at C.J. Strike Reservoir. DEQ officials monitored cyanobacteria, also known as blue-green algae, and associated toxins where harmful algal blooms (HABs) were present and have confirmed that blue-green algae levels in the reservoir have returned to normal and toxin levels are below the safety threshold.

Other blooms may exist on this waterbody that have not been reported to DEQ or the health district. Water users should always exercise caution around water bodies with visible slime or surface scum or a foul odor. High concentrations of toxin-producing cyanobacteria may cause illness to both humans and animals. Report any concerns to DEQ at 208.373.0550

For more information about harmful algal blooms, visit DEQ’s website at http://www.deq.idaho.gov/water-quality/surface-water/blue-green-algae/.

# # #

Chase Cusack, DEQ                         208.373.0490              Chase.Cusack@deq.idaho.gov

Katrina Williams, SWDH           208.455.5317               Katrina.Williams@phd3.idaho.gov

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CYANOBACTERIA ADVISORY LIFTED FOR LAKE LOWELL

News Release

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE                                                        

CYANOBACTERIA ADVISORY LIFTED FOR LAKE LOWELL

Southwest District Health (SWDH), in conjunction with the Idaho Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ), has lifted the Health Advisory for Lake Lowell. DEQ officials monitored cyanobacteria, also known as blue-green algae, and associated toxins where harmful algal blooms (HABs) were present and have confirmed that blue-green algae levels in Lake Lowell have returned to normal and toxin levels are below the safety threshold.

Other blooms may exist on this waterbody that have not been reported to DEQ or the health district. Water users should always exercise caution around water bodies with visible slime or surface scum or a foul odor. High concentrations of toxin-producing cyanobacteria may cause illness to both humans and animals. Report any concerns to DEQ at 208.373.0550

For more information about harmful algal blooms, visit DEQ’s website at http://www.deq.idaho.gov/water-quality/surface-water/blue-green-algae/.

# # #

Chase Cusack, DEQ                         208.373.0490              Chase.Cusack@deq.idaho.gov

Katrina Williams, SWDH                  208.455.5317               Katrina.Williams@phd3.idaho.gov

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